Books

BOOKS BY PROFESSOR DAVID SCHLOSBERG

9780199685271

Oxford Handbook of Environmental Political Theory
Co-edited with Teena Gabrielson, Cheryl Hall, and John Meyer. Oxford University Press, 2016. [Amazon link]

Set at the intersection of political theory and environmental politics, yet with broad engagement across the environmental social sciences and humanities, The Oxford Handbook of Environmental Political Theory, defines, illustrates, and challenges the field of environmental political theory (EPT). Featuring contributions from distinguished political scientists working in this field, this volume addresses canonical theorists and contemporary environmental problems with a diversity of theoretical approaches. The initial volume focuses on EPT as a field of inquiry, engaging both traditions of political thought and the academy. In the second section, the handbook explores conceptualizations of nature and the environment, as well as the nature of political subjects, communities, and boundaries within our environments. A third section addresses the values that motivate environmental theorists — including justice, responsibility, rights, limits, and flourishing — and the potential conflicts that can emerge within, between, and against these ideals. The final section examines the primary structures that constrain or enable the achievement of environmental ends, as well as theorizations of environmental movements, citizenship, and the potential for on-going environmental action and change.

animal-politicsPolitical Animals and Animal Politics
Co-edited with Marcel Wissenburg. Palgrave Macmillan, 2014. [Amazon link]
While much has been written on environmental politics on the one hand, and animal ethics and welfare on the other, animal politics, as the interface of the two, is underexamined. There are key political implications in the increase of animal protection laws, the rights of nature, and political parties and movements dedicated to animals. What are the implications of the increasing attention and popularity of ethical discourses on animal welfare and animal rights for politics and political philosophy? What is the animal’s place in environmental political thought – and in 21st Century political philosophy per se? What can, rather than should, politics do for animals – what institutions and practices are suitable and desirable? Can animal ethics learn from animal politics?

climate-challenged Climate-Challenged Society
Co-authored with John Dryzek and Richard Norgaard. Oxford University Press, 2013. [Amazon link]
This book is an original, accessible, and thought-provoking introduction to the severe and broad-ranging challenges that climate change presents and how societies can respond. It synthesizes and deploys cutting-edge scholarship on the range of social, economic, political, and philosophical issues surrounding climate change. The treatment is introductory, but the book is written “with attitude”, for nobody has yet charted in coherent, integrative, and effective fashion a way to move societies beyond their current paralysis as they face the challenges of climate change. The coverage begins with an examination of science, public opinion, and policy making, with special attention to organized climate change denial. The book then moves to economic analysis and its limits; different kinds of policies; climate justice; governance at all levels from the local to the global; and the challenge of an emerging “Anthropocene” in which the mostly unintended consequences of human action drive the earth system into a more chaotic and unstable era. The conclusion considers the prospects for fundamental transition in ideas, movements, economics, and governance.

handbookThe Oxford Handbook of Climate Change and Society
Co-edited with John Dryzek and Richard Norgaard. Oxford University Press, 2011. [Amazon link]

Climate change presents perhaps the most profound challenge ever confronted by human society. This volume is a definitive analysis drawing on the best thinking on questions of how climate change affects human systems, and how societies can, do, and should respond. Key topics covered include the history of the issues, social and political reception of climate science, the denial of that science by individuals and organized interests, the nature of the social disruptions caused by climate change, the economics of those disruptions and possible responses to them, questions of human security and social justice, obligations to future generations, policy instruments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and governance at local, regional, national, international, and global levels.

pluralism

Environmentalism in the United States: Changing Patterns of Activism and Advocacy
Co-edited with Elizabeth Bomberg. Routledge, 2008. 
[Amazon link]

Environmentalism – defined here as activism aimed at protecting the environment or improving its condition – is undergoing significant change in the United States. Under attack from the current administration and direct questioning from its own ranks, environmentalism in the US is at a crossroads. This special issue will explore the changing patterns of and challenges to environmentalism in the contemporary US. More specifically, it will examine the following dynamics: The re-conceptualisation of core ideas and strategies defining US environmentalism; Questions of identity and relations with other advocacy groups (including labour, global justice and women’s groups); Institutional change (especially the shift away from regulatory policies and approaches); The expanding arenas of activism, to both above and below the state; Environmentalists’ response to Bush administration policies and priorities. This book was previously published as a special issue of Environmental Politics.

DefiningenvirojusticeDefining Environmental Justice
Oxford University Press, 2007.
[Amazon link]

This book will appeal to anyone interested in environmental politics, environmental movements, and justice theory. The basic task of this book is to explore what, exactly, is meant by ‘justice’ in definitions of environmental and ecological justice. It examines how the term is used in both self-described environmental justice movements and in theories of environmental and ecological justice. The central argument is that a theory and practice of environmental justice necessarily includes distributive conceptions of justice, but must also embrace notions of justice based in recognition, capabilities, and participation. Throughout, the goal is the development of a broad, multi-faceted, yet integrated notion of justice that can be applied to both relations regarding environmental risks in human populations and relations between human communities and non-human nature.

debatingDebating the Earth: The Environmental Politics Reader, 2nd edition
Co-edited with John Dryzek. Oxford University Press, 2005.
[Amazon link]

Debating the Earth brings together more than 40 essential readings which illustrate the diversity of political responses to environmental issues. The readings are organized in a way that emphasizes the differences and debates across the various schools of thought on environmental affairs. The second edition includes a new section, The Global South and Indigenous Perspectives, and offers 25 new extracts.

green-states-and-socialGreen States and Social Movements: Environmentalism in the United States, Britain, Germany, and Norway
Co-authored with John Dryzek, David Downes, and Christian Hunold. Oxford University Press, 2003
[Amazon link]

Social movements take shape in relation to the kind of state they face, while over time states are transformed by the movements that they both incorporate and resist. Green States and Social Movements is a comparative study of the environmental movement’s successes and failures in four very different states: the U.S.A., U.K., Germany and Norway. The history covers the entire sweep of the modern environmental era that begins in 1970. The end in view is a green transformation of the state and society on a par with earlier transformations that gave us first the liberal capitalist state and then the welfare state. The authors explain why such a transformation is now most likely in Germany, and why it is least likely in the United States, which has lost the status of environmental pioneer that it gained in the early 1970s. Their comparative analysis also explains the role played by social movements in making modern societies more deeply democratic, and yields insights into the strategic choices of environmental movements as they decide on what terms to engage, enter or resist the state. Sometimes it makes sense for a movement to act conventionally, as a green party or set of interest groups. But sometimes inclusion can mean co-optation, in which case a movement can instead emphasize action in and through civil society.

enviropluralismEnvironmental Justice and the New Pluralism
Oxford University Press, 1999.
[Amazon link]

In the first ever theoretical treatment of the environmental justice movement, David Schlosberg demonstrates the development of a new form of ‘critical’ pluralism, in both theory and practice. Taking into account the evolution of environmentalism and pluralism over the course of the century, the author argues that the environmental justice movement and new pluralist theories now represent a considerable challenge to both conventional pluralist thought and the practices of the major groups in the US environmental movement. Much of recent political theory has been aimed at how to acknowledge and recognize, rather than deny, the diversity inherent in contemporary life. In practice, the myriad ways people define and experience the ‘environment’ has given credence to a form of environmentalism that takes difference seriously. The environmental justice movement, with its base in diversity, its networked structure, and its communicative practices and demands, exemplifies the attempt to design political practices beyond those one would expect from a standard interest group in the conventional pluralist model.